The “Triumph of Hope”

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Glossary

Agrafe — a clasp on clothes and metal armor. In addition to the utilitarian function, it served as a costume decoration. They were often made of gold, silver, and precious stones.

Alba — white clothing, a kind of tunic with sleeves, part of the clothing of Catholic bishops.

Aumônière — a purse hanging from a belt in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Balzo — the headdress of a married woman in the Renaissance.

Bragette — a flap valve. Laced to the chausses with ribbons.

Brassard — a part of a military outfit in different eras, arm protection made of leather or metal.

Cape — a coat cut in the shape of a semicircle.

Chaperon — men's and women's headdress in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Chausses — stockings for men and women in the Middle Ages. In a man’s suit, as clothes were shortened in the 14th century, the bosses became longer until they connected at the back and began to be laced up at the waist to other clothes.

Chemise — an undershirt (from the Middle Ages to this day).

Cotte — an upper shirt in the Middle Ages, for the nobility - a richly decorated ceremonial shirt.

Cuirasse — a part of a military outfit in different eras, protection of the torso made of leather or metal.

Chemise — an undershirt (from the Middle Ages to this day).

Cotte — an upper shirt in the Middle Ages, for the nobility - a richly decorated ceremonial shirt.

Cuirasse — a part of a military outfit in different eras, protection of the torso made of leather or metal.

Dalmatic — outerwear with sleeves; knee-length or below. In the Byzantine Empire - the clothes of the emperor and the hierarchs of the church made of precious fabrics. In Western Europe, known since the 8th century.

French hood — a complex multi-layer headdress of a married woman in the Renaissance, the distinguishing feature of which was the hood, which covered long hair.

Houppelande — men's and women's outerwear of the nobility in the Late Middle Ages, voluminous and prominent due to expensive fabrics, finishes, and the amount of draperies.

Jambière — a part of a military outfit in different eras, leg protection made of leather or metal.

Jippon — a tight-fitting jacket with narrow sleeves or sleeveless, to which the chausses are laced.

Kolpos — the hollow formed by the upper forepart of a loose garment bound by a girdle or sash in a costume of Ancient Greece.

Mantle (fr. - manteau) is a long cloak with a train, part of the ceremonial vestments of kings and queens.

Mitre (Latin - mitra pretiosa) — a headdress, part of the liturgical vestments of the highest Catholic priests, worn on great holidays, richly decorated with gold embroidery and precious stones. The two ribbons were attached to the mitre, which symbolized the Old and New Testaments.

Pourpoint — men's tight-fitting clothing with sleeves.

Robe — men's and women's clothing in a Western European costume of the 13th century, the upper dress. Since the 16th century, a woman’s dress.

Sandals (Greek - σανδάλιον, plural - σανδάλια, lat. - solea) — open shoes, consisting of soles and ropes or leather straps, with which they are strapped to the legs.

Seinture — - belt. It was made of various materials, depending on the wealth and social status of the owner.

Transado — a young woman’s headdress in the form of a net covering the back of the head in the Renaissance.

Tunic (lat. - tunica) — amen's and women's clothing in Ancient Rome, the Byzantine Empire, Western Europe in the Early Middle Ages.